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ISSUED WEEKLY BY 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 



VOL. 33 



DECEMBER 28, 1936 



FEATURE ARTICLE 



NO . 26 



PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURAL TRADE WITH CANADA 
(Page 809) 



Page 
. 803 



IN THIS ISSUE 

Argentine small grain harvest favorable 

Japanese wheat and flour prices unchanged 803 

Manchuria to import less flour 804 

Japanese dry bean crop reduced 805 

Indian cotton crop forecast slightly above 1935-36 806 

Italian cotton consumption reduced 806 

Sao Paulo, Brazil, cottonseed-oii production increased... 808 

Norwegian low-duty period on apples and pears begins early 808 



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G02 



Foreign Grops and Market's 
LATE CABLES 



Vol. 33, }Jo. 26 



Irish j'reo State revised estimates of crop acreages 
placed as follows wi th 1935 figures in parentheses: Wheat 255,000 
acres (163,000), oats 559,000 (614,000)", barley 130,000 (139,000), 
potatoes 334,000 acres (336,000). (Agricultural Attache' C. C. 
Teller, Londin, December 22, 1936.) 

Irish Jreo Stete revised June 1 estimates of livestock 
number s given as follows with June 1, 1935, figures in parentheses 
Cattle 4,014,000 (4,019,000), sheep 3,062,000 (3,042,000), sows 
104,000 (114,000), total hogs 1,017,000 (1,03 J, 000). (Agricultural 
Attache' C. C. Taylor, London, December 22, 1935.) 



December 28, 1936 Foreign Crops end Markets 

CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS 



803 



BREAD GRAINS 

Argen t ine small grain harves t favorable 

Production of small grains in Argentina in 1936-37 promises to 
be much above that of the preceding year, according to a cable from 
Paul 0. Nyhus , Agricultural Attache at Buenos Aires. The increase is 
the result of a larger acreage as well a„s higher yields. 

The wheat crop is officially estimated at 249,855,000 bushels 
or more 'than 100,000,000 bushels above la.st year's poor crop. Thresh- 
ing is in full swing. Yields in the north are excellent with probable 
record yields in the Provinces of Cordoba arid Santa Ee. In the south, 
however, tnere has been some frost damage , and in the western part of 
Buenos Aires province yields were reduced by early drought. 

Production of small grains is shown in the table below with 
comparisons. 

ARGENTIANA: Acreage and production of specified grains, 

1935-36 and 1936-37 



Crop 


Acr.eaee harvested 


Production 


1935-36 


1936-57 


1935-36 


1936-37 


Tfneat 

Flaxseed 


1,000 acres 


1,000 acres 


1,000 bushels 


1,000 bushels 


11,913 

583 \ 
1,287 . 
1,385 
5,159 


15,728 

988 

; 1,409 

! 2 , 039 
i 6,556 


141,021 
5 , 000 
35 , 825 
21,127 
56,099 


249,855 
8 , 858 
56,493 ' 
31,232 
70,863 



Compiled from official sources. 

Japan ese wheat a nd f lour prices unchanged 

Japanese domestic wheat and flour prices remained unchanged during 
the month of November, while foreign wheat quotations were substantially 
higher, according to information furnished the Shanghai office by American 
Consul Tower at Tokyo. Failure of domestic wheat and flour prices to 
follow foreign prices was attributed to larger than normal supplies of 
domestic wheat available for commercial milling. Elour mill activity im- 
proved somewhat during November as a, result of the continued strong 
domestic demand for flour and slightly stronger export demand. Exports 
to Manchuria are expected to continue in fair volume as long as Manchuria 
restricts Australian imports as a. result of the trade dispute between J -pan 



804 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, Ho. 26 

CROP AND MAP. KET PROSPECTS, CONT'D 



and Australia. Japanese millers are interested in American wheat, "but 
the strike on the Pacific Coast has prevented any new transactions. 

Prices of wheat at the mill on December 1, duty and landing charges 
included, were quoted as follows: Western White No. 2, $1.47 per "bushel; 
Canadian No. 3, $1.53; No. 1. $1.59; Australian $1.43; Manchurian, $1.42; 
Argentine, $1.40. The import duty at present rate of exchange is 32.4 
cents per bushel. Domestic standard wheat was $1.22 and Portland wheat, 
c.i.f. Yokohama, $1.14 per bushel. The wholesale price cf flour at the 
mill, which includes duty, was $1.31 per bag of 49 pounds and c.i.f. Dairen 
was $1.14. 

Imports of wheat into Japan during November were reported as 
follows with November 1935 comparisons in parentheses: From Canada 
309,000 bushels (0), Australia 0 (709,000), Argentina 0 (64,000), Man- 
churia 62,000 (134,000), China 178,000 (0), United States 90,000 (0), 
total 639,000 bushels (907,000). November flour exports were 121,736 
barrels compared with 49,990 for October and 274,890 for November 1935. 

Manchuria to import less flour 

Imports of wheat flour into Manchuria during the 1936-37 crop year 
are expected to be below the amount imported during the 2 preceding seasons, 
according to information furnished the Shanghai office by American Vice 
Consul Brennan at Dairen. North Manchurian flour mills are furnishing an 
increasing proportion of flour consumed, and the demand for foreign flour 
continues to decline. During the 1935-36 crop year (July-June) 3, 124,000 
barrels of foreign flour were imported into South Manchuria compared with 
6,031,000 for the preceding season. Flour imports for July through October 
this year were only 614,000 barrels as compared with 1,246,000 for the 
corresponding period last year. 

The 1936 Manchurian wheat crop is estimated at over 33,000,000 
bushels as compared with the 1935 crop of 37,600,000 bushels, which was 
the largest harvest since 1932. On July 1 this year the carry-over of 
wheat was estimated at from 3,500,000 to 7,000,000 bushels larger than a 
year ago, making the available wheat supply fully equal to that of the 
1935-36 season. Increased Manchurian production of other food crops in 
1936 and higher flour prices are important factors which are expected to 
decrease flour imports further. 

During the past 2 seasons, Japan and Australia have been the prin- 
cipal sources of imported flour. In recent months Japan has been the 



December 28, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 

CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, CON T'D 



805 



main source of imports, followed by Australia and China. A small quant 
has been purchased from the United States. 

Largely as a result of the decreased requirements, stocks of 
foreign flour carried in the markets are much below those of a year 
ago. At Dairencn November 10 such stocks totaled 77,000 barrels as 
compared with 294,000 for the same date in 1935. 



DRY BEANS 



Japa nese dry bean crop reduced 

The final estimate of the 1936 dry bean output for Hokkaido, 
the principle producing region of Japan, is placed at 155,200,000 
pounds as against an earlier estimate of 174,200,000 pounds, ac- 
cording to information received from Agricultural Commissioner Owen 
L. Dawson at Shanghai. The 1935 crop amounted to 133,842,000 pounds 
Poor weather conditions reduced the bean crop. The quality of the 
1936 bean crop is lower than that of last year's crop. 

HOKKAIDO: Production of specified crops, 
1935 and 1936 



Crop 


: 1935 


• 1936 




1,000 pounds 


1,000 pounds 


Beans ~ 






Otenashi 


41,356 


34,600 


Nagauzura 


10,534 


13,200 


Daifuku 


8,006 


9,400 


Shiromaru , 


668 


600 


Chunaga 


30,506 


34 , 000 


Kuitoki 


35,004 


47,600 


Others 


7,768 


15,800 


Total 


133,842 


155,200 


Green peas 


78,548 


59,580 


Pyre thrum 


11,936 


10,800 


Rapeseed , 


14,924 


16,400 


Peppermint 


848 


1,265 



Compiled from official sources 



80S 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 26 

C R ^ P AND MARKET PROSPECTS, CONT'D 



COTTON 

Indian cotton crop forecast slightly above 1935-36 



The first forecast of cotton production in India for the 1936-37 
season is placed at 4,584,000 hales of 478 pounds each, as compared with 
the revised first forecast for the 1935-36 crop of 4,493,000 hales, and 
a final estimate of 4,793,000 bales, according to a cable received from 
the Director of Statistics at Calcutta. The third forecast of acreage 
for the 1936-37 crop is placed at 23,901,000 acres as against the revised 
corresponding forecast at this time last year of 24,130,000 acres and a 
final estimate of 25,138,000 acres for the 1935-36 crop. These forecasts 
indicate an increase of 2 percent in production and a decrease of about 
1 percent in acreage compared with the corresponding 1935 figures. 

Itali an cotton consumption reduced 

Total cotton consumption in Italy from August 1, 1935, to July 31, 

1935, is unofficially estimated at 628,000 bales, a decline of 20 percent 
compared with the 788,000 bales officially reported for 1934-35, according 
to a report from American Consul Lester L. Schnare in Milan. The peak 
consumption in recent years was 1,001,000 bales in 1929-30. Since then 

it has averaged around 800,000 bales annually. The decline during the 
past season is attributed to the imposition of sanctions and the result- 
ing loss of export markets, and to an increased use of substitute fibers 
produced in Italy. 

American cotton seems to have suffered less than Indian and Egyptian, 
425,000 bales having been consumed in 1935-36 compared with 455,000 bales the 
year before, a decline of only 7 percent. Consumption of Indian cotton 
is estimated at from 30,000 to 40,000 bales compared with 185,000 bales 
in 1934-35, and of Egyptian at from 70,000 to 80,000 bales compared with 
94,000 bales the year before. Consumption of all other growths, mainly 
South American, is estimated at from 80,000 to 100,000 bales compared with 
the official estimate of only 54 , 000 bales in 1934-35. 

The decline in the consumption of Indian and Egyptian cotton is at- 
tributed to the imposition of sanctions in November 1935. The smaller con- 
sumption of American and the larger use of other growths is attributed to 
the Italian restrictions on cotton imports during the first 6 months of 

1936, to the special trading arrangements made by the Italian Government 
with South American countries, from which larger amounts were imported than 
ever before, and to the higher price of American cotton compared with that 
of similar qualities available from other sources. 



December 28, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 807 

CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, CONT'D 



The Cotton Institute in Milan is now considering the authorization 
of a substantial import of cotton for the manufacture of goods for domestic 
use during 1936-37. Difficulty is being experienced, however, in arranging 
for a satisfactory allocation of the imports to the individual manufacturers. 
Quotas based on the value of the cotton heretofore consumed would be dis- 
advantageous to manufacturers of coarse yarns and fabrics, who require a 
large amount of cotton. On the other hand, quotas based on the quantity 
previously used would be disadvantageous to spinners of fine yarns and 
fabrics, who use small amounts of high grade cotton. 

The recently adopted policy concerning imports of cotton to be used 
in the manufacture of goods for the export trade is not working so well as was 
expected, according to the report. This policy permits exporters of cotton 
goods to use all of the proceeds from their export sales for the purchase of 
raw cotton with which to manufacture more goods for export. Difficulties 
have been experienced, however, in financing the exports of cotton goods 
and in obtaining needed supplies of raw cotton while awaiting payment for 
the goods exported. The delay in payment usually amounts to 5 months or 
more. 

In order to obtain immediate supplies of raw cotton, not only is the 
manufacturer required to pledge to the "Institute Cotoniero" that the proceeds 
from his export sales of cotton goods will be devoted exclusively to the 
purchase of raw cotton but he must also support that pledge by a draft in 
lire equal to four times the exchange value of the goods exported. Whenever 
the value of such exports reaches a substantial figure, the amount of the 
draft in lire is very large and the taxes for the stamps required on it 
often amount to as high as 10,000 lire. Furthermore, some companies are 
forbidden by their articles of incorporation to give drafts for any amount. 
Under these circumstances, the arrangements for the importation of cotton 
by export manufacturers are not meeting with the results expected. 

Milan cotton brokers are pessimistic over the prospects for the sale 
of American cotton in Italy during the current season (1936-37) and expect 
a considerable shrinkage in imports from the United States compared with 
the 1935-36 season, according to the report. The principal reason for this 
attitude is said to be the high price of American cotton and the fact that 
large quantities of cotton of similar quality are available at lower 
prices from other sources, particularly from India and South America. 



808 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 26 

CRIP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, CON T'D 



OILS AND OILSEEDS 

Cottonseed-oil production increased in Sao Paulo, Brazil 

Cottonseed-oil production in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil 
has increased from 8,000 tons in 1931 to an estimated 45,000 tons for 
1936, according to a report from Vice Consul W. E. Flournoy in Sao Paulo. 
Last year 24,000 tons were produced. The American market has furnished 
the main outlet for the greatly augmented output, according to the report. 
During 1935 the United States took 70 percent of the 8,000 tons exported 
and during the first nine months of 1935 about 95 percent of the 12,000 
tons exported. Great Britain took roost of the balance. 

The entire oil output of the State is handled by eleven mills with 
a combined crushirg capacity of 2,000' tons of seed per day. These mills 
employ 2,700 worknen and are located in the interior cotton growing' and 
ginning centers of the State. Modern hot press methods of extraction are 
used. Practically all of the oil is refined by the kettle method. The 
soap stock resulting from the refining process is used locally by the soap 
industry. 

Approximately 348,000 tens of seed were available for oil in the 
State during 1935. Cotton seed is not quoted on any market in the State. 
Its sale is a matter of private arrangement between the ginner and the oil 
mills. It is estimated that the cottonseed mills are obtaining 4 percent 
linters, 13 percent oil, 40 percent cake, and 43 percent, husks from the 
seed used. 



FRUIT, VEGETABLES, AND NUTS 
Norwegian low-duty period on apples and peais begins January 19 



The beginning of the low-duty period on imports of apples and pears 
into Norway has been moved up from March 16 to January 19, according to a 
cable received from the An? eric an Legation at Oslo . Ir e low -duty period 
extends to July 31. During this period apples and pears are subject to 
a basic duty of 0.20 krone, per kilogram, plus surtaxes amounting to 0.16 
krone, making a total charge of 0-36 krone per kilogram or about 4 cents 
per pound at the current rate of exchange. These lo v-dixty period rates rep- 
resent an extremely high import charge for apples end pears. For the re- 
mainder of the year,' however, the total charge is double that of the low- 
duty period. 



December 28 , ,1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



809 



PROGRESS OP AGRICULTURAL TRADE T/ITH CANADA 

Exports of United States agricultural products to Canada in the 
first 10 months of 1935 were valued at ,.$41 , 421 , 000 against $33,612,000 
in the corresponding 1935 period. The current figures show a greater 
relative gain over last year in items on which Canada granted duty reduc- 
tions than in items on which no concessions were granted. The figures for 
October 1936 show a marked gain over those for October 1935. 

Imports into the United States of Canadian agricultural commodities 
totaled $66,564,000 in the first 10 months of 1936. The corresponding 

1935 figure was $45,007,000. The relatively high level of United States 
agricultural prices this year is reflected in the fact that the value of the 
10-months 1 import trade in non-concession items increased over 1935 figures 
to a greater degree than did imports of concession items. The larger October 

1936 figures for non-concession imports continue the tendency toward in- 
creased business in such items noted in recent months. 

E xports 

United States exports to Canada in October were well maintained over 
last year's levels in most of the leading commodity groups. Items in the 
meat group were outstanding for their gains in volume over the October 1935 
figures. In all groups, the showing with respect to last year's movement 
was somewhat better than the compa.rison with the September 1936 exports, 
after taking seasonal conditions into consideration. 

Hams and shoulders, pickled pork, sausage casings, and lard all m«ved 
in volumes considerably larger than in October 1935. Exports of these items 
also advanced over the September figures, with hams and shoulders especially 
prominent, Increases over last year also were registered in live poultry 
and eggs, with a decline showing for dressed poultry. 

In grains and cereals, corn exports for October increased sharply 
over the 1935 figures despite the relatively high United States prices pre- 
vailing. The current exports also were larger than in September of this year. 
Exports of milled rice also gained over September, but were smaller than in 
October 1935, while the movement of rough rice made no appreciable gain over 
the insignificant figures of recent months. Exports of packaged oatmeal and 
other cereal foods, however, made a fair increase against last year's figures 
for the month. 

The October exports of fresh vegetables made an aggregate gain over 
September figures, but failed to equal the level for the same month a year 
earlier. Substantial gains, however, were recorded for canned and dried 
vegetables over the positions established in the two comparable periods. In 
fresh fruit also a notable advance appeared for both grapefruit and oranges 
with respect to the October 1935 exports. Apples, grapes, and berries also 
moved in larger volume. Declines, however, were registered for both melons 
and pears. 



810 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol.33, No. 26 



PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURAL TRADE T7ITH CANADA, CONT'D 

In dried and canned f ruit, a number of declines "below' last year's 
volume were recorded. These included such important items as dried and 
canned apricots and peaches, and also canned grapefruit. Canned pears 
and pineapples moved in larger volume this year than last, and of the 
items mentioned these two were the only ones in which the October 
1936 trade was larger than that of September. In nuts, both pecans and 
walnuts moved in larger volume this year than during October of 1S35. 

Imports 

Declines in import volumes below the September level marked the 
October imports from Canada of most items on which concessions were 
granted by the United States. Of the items showing an increase, some, 
such as live turkeys and turnips, reflected seasonal trends. In 
others, notably grass and forage seeds, the increased volume of imports 
reflected the drought losses of the past summer. Imports of seed potatoes 
also increased. In a few cases, including cattle, the current figures 
were smaller than those of October 1935. 

Total imports of dutiable cattle, Largely from Canada, amounted 
to little more than 20,000 head during October. Imports of all classes 
were smaller than .in the preceding month with the exception of full-duty 
cattle under 700 pounds coming from Mexico. The increase in that class 
however, was too small to bring the total imports up to the September 
figure. Imports also showed a drop of nearly 9,000 head below the October 
1935 total. 

The main lovv-duty cattle quota was exhausted during the week ended 
November 14. The final share supplied by Canada is not yet known, but 
the distribution of imports as of November 7 showed Canada as having 
provided 86.4 percent of the quota, with Mexico sending 13.6 percent. 
Up to November 23, dairy cov/s to the number of 5,780 head had been admitted 
under the low-duty quota of 20,000 head, all of them coming from Canada. 
The low-duty quota on calves weighing less than 175 pounds has been filled 
since last August. As the quotas become exhausted, imports of these 
classes of cattle are continued upon payment of the full-duty rates. 

The October decline in imports of Cheddar cheese from Canada re- 
sulted in a figure for the month about half as large as the September im- 
ports. Domestic production in October, at nearly 45,000,000 pounds, was 
seasonally large. As a rule, production is expected to decline in October 
and the other autumn months. This year's increased October output was ac- 
companied by a continued firm price position. Total imports for the first 
10 months of 1936 represented 2.33 percent of total domestic production 
for the same period. In 1935, cheese imports from Canada, largely Cheddar, 
represented 0.16 percent of domestic production for the first 10 months. 



December 28, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



811 



PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURAL TRADE WITH CAM ADA , CONT'D 

The figure of 2.33 percent for the first 10 months of 1936 compares with 
1.84 percent as the average for the comparable period of 1925 to 1929. 

The total low-duty quota of 750,000 "bushels of certified seed 
potatoes was filled by November 30. Eor the period January-February 1935-36 
such potatoes were entered at a reduced duty of 60 cents per 100 pounds, 
and at 45 cents for the months March-November 1936. The new quota period 
for 1936-37 opened on December 1, 1936, with the duty again at 60 cents. 
Had the low-duty quota been filled prior to November 30, any certified seed 
imported between the filling of the quota and December 1 would have paid 
the full-duty rate of 75 cents. Practically all of the certified seed im- 
ported this year has come from Canada. Judging from the imports recorded 
for the period December-October, about 281,000 bushels were entered during 
the month of November to complete the quota. Prices of seed potatoes have 
been well maintained in recent weeks. 

Imports in October of cream, apples, and turnips from Canada were 
larger than in September and also fbove the October 1935 figures. Imports of 
horses, hay, maple sugar, and cereal breakfast foods, v/hile under the 
September level, were, considerably larger than in October of las;fc year. In 
poultry, imports of both live and dressed chickens in October declined below 
the September level but continued higher than the 1935 figures.- 



CREAM: Imports into the United States from Canada, and total imports, 

by months, 1935 and 1936 





1935 


1936 


Month i 












Canada 


Total 


Canada 


Total 




Gallons 


Gallons 


Gallons 


Gallons 




4 


4 


10 


10 




34 


34 


:"346 


248 




£5 


79 


1 , 035 ' 


1,035 




36 


76 


2,012 


2,043 




45 


142 


1 , 620 


1,761 




63 


125 


1,132 


1,136 




: 14 


14 


777 " 


789 




69 


; 69 


1,922 


1 , 922 




96 


96 


6,584 


6,692 




: 15 


75 


9,297 


9,297 




\ 421 


; 714 


24, 635 


24,933 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- 
merce . 



812 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, Ho. 26 

PROGRESS W AGRICULTURAL TRADE WITH CANADA, CONT'D 

CATTLE: Imports into the United States from Canada and Mexico, 
by months, 1935 and 1936 



Country, 
year, and 
month 


700 pounds and over 


Under 700 pounds 


; Total 
| dutiable 
; cattle 


Dp i rv 
Cows 


Others 


: 

; Total 


Less than 
175 
pounds 


175 to 

699 
pounds 


Total 


CAN A3 A: 

First quarter . . . 
Second quarter . . 


Num be r 


Number 


' Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


; Number 


a/ 


a/ 


' 16,166 


-a/ 


4- 


' 5.231 


: 21.397 


/ 

— zL- 


: — 4- 


34,089 


^ 


a/ 


16.912 


: 51.001 




- 

it 


: 2,483 
1,987 
: 2,056 


sJ 

H 

■ — H — 


sJ 

— 5- 


3,670 
3,531 
. 7,346 


: 6,153 
: 5,518 
i 9,402 


Third quarter . . . 




—4- 


6 , 526 


— H — 




14 , 547 


. 21,073 




, — 4_ 


2,309 


a/ 




11,926 


: 14.235 


Total 10 months 
1936 ~ 

First quarter. . . 
Second quarter. . 




a/ 


59, 090 


i 

a/ 


a/ 


48.616 


: 107, 706 


671 


31,861 


32,532 


4,261 


2,246 


■ 6 , 507 




2,010 


78,855 


80, 865 


29 , 923 


8. 095 


38, 018 


: 118, 883 




564 
835 
815 


8,643 
5, 035 
7,902 


9,207 
5,870 
8,717 


14,198 
2,631 
1,354 


2,406 
4,034 
6,248 


16,604 
6 , 665 
7,602 


: 25,811 
; 12,535 
: 16,319 


Third quarter. .. 


2,214 


21,580 


23,794 


18, 183 


12.688 


30.871 


54, 665 


562 ! 2.581 


3.143 


849 


6 r 129 


6 r 978 


10, 121 


Total 10 months 
MEXICO: 

1935 - 

First quarter. . . . 

Second quarter... 
Third quarter. . . . 


5,457 134,877 


140.334 


53.216 


29,158 


82 r 374 


222.708 


a/ 


a/ 


152 


a/ 


a/ 


73,937 


74,089 


a/ 


a/ 


1,958 


a/ 


a/ 


75,376 


77,334 


it 




194 

514 
49 


a/ 

■ 1 


a/ ' 


10,652 
9,216 
3,419 


10,846 

9,730 
3 , 468 


a/ 


a/ 


757 


' 4 ' 




23,287 


24,044 




11 


3,029 


— H — ' 


a/ 


13,800 


16,829 


Total 10 months 1 
1936 - 
First quarter. . . . 
Second quarter. . . 

Third quarter 


a/ 


tl 


5,896 


a/ 


a/ 


186,400 


192,296 


0 


11,465 


11,465 


226 


49,352 


49,578 


61,043 


0 


7,884 


7,884 


406 


52, 195 


52,601 


60,485 


0 

0 
0 


1,306 

557 ; 
45 


1,306 
557 
45 


881 

93 ; 
9 


5,346 
5,347 
5,773 


6,227 " 
5,440 : 
5,782 | 


7,533 
5,997 
5,827 


0 


1, 908 


1,908 


983 


16.466 


17,449 I 


19,357 


0 


178 


178 


0 


9,630 


9.630 ■ 


9,808 


Total 10 months 


0 


21.435 21.435 


1.615 


127.643 


129.258 150.693 .. 



a/ Not classified prior to January 1, 1936 



December 28, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



813 



PROGRESS OP AGRICULTURAL TRADE WITH CANADA, CONT'D 
CHEDDAR CHEESE: United States production, and imports from Canada, 





•by months, 


civ ci t- 1 '^. v 


1925-29 , annual 


1935 and 1936 








Average 1925- 


on 


1935 


1936 








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X w 1 U^l-U 






P p -rn p Y] f, 






P g rcent 






Impo rt s 


XH1JJ w X V O 


P r»n — 

X I w 




XlLi LJ U X u 0 


P ro- 
x x u — 


Tm7^ nrf, c 

X11J U \J x u 0 


i rn T) n t ti ^ 


1V1U 11 Oil 


r re- 


from 






*P v* r\ m 

x x Urn 


dX t U x 


U.UW 0 X 'J J- 1 


X X KJiil 


0 v»p rj"P 

CLX OX 




duction 


Can ad a 




b/ 
2.1 


Uc^llciU-ci 




c/ 


P.QT 1 Q Q 
UCU- CXvJ-Ct 


-nfO- 

JJl v 






! — AI 


rh ] c f , i on 




a/ 


n r* "t* "i nTi 
UUt u x Uii 






U. U.O U X W i. — 




1 000 


1 000 




1 000 


1 000 




1 000 


1,000 






""iniTnrl q 

[ J {J vXL 1 \J- o 


nr\ HI T 'P r\ Q 
U Llii U. o 


P p -rp ori f, 

X CI w vU V 






Pp rppn f 


|JU LX. x U. 0 


nnn n ^ c: 


p p pn f. 


Jan . . . . 


1 fi ion 


A£7 


2. 57 


DO "1 07 


1 RO 


U • CO 


oi? j ±<J«J 


707 


9 40 


Feb 


1 O ^1 H 
Id , f X. ( 




1. 52 


Ol 0 1 O 
.CI, ^ X 




0 0 


id r , Uol 






Mar .... 




OO r 


1.46 


0 0 , ZJ x^t 




• 0 0 




1 526 


4. 70 


An t . 


27,809 


328 


X . ID 


32,825 


47 


.14 


37,089 ' 


373 


1.01 


ivitAy .... 


38,224 


424 


1 11 
1.11 


48,926 


66 


,13 ' 


52,395 


122 


0.23 


June . . . 


46,061 


756 


1 64 


60,560 


63 


.10 


67,101 


493 


0.73 


July . . . 


42 , 029 


742 


1.77 


55 , 238 


36 


.07 


53 , 032 


1,814 


3.42 


Aug. . . . 


34,976 


595 


1.70 


53,101 


55 


.10 ' 


44,451 


2,339 


5.26 


Sept . . . 


29,461 


509 


1.73 


49 , 053 


24 


.05 


43,307 


1,367 


3.16 


Oct 


25,105 


1,159 


4.62 


42,114 


61 


. .14 


44,965 . 


685 


1.52 


Nov. . . . 


18 , 224 


1,342 


7,36 


28,811 


82 


.28 








Dec. . . . 


17,375 


1,273 


7.33 


27 , 341 


33 


.12 








Total. . 


339,299 


8,216 


2.42 


468 , 999 


769 


.16 









a/ Mostly cheddar cheese. p_/ Final figures. oj Preliminary figures revised on 
basis of final figures for 1935. 



POTATOES: Imports into the United States from Canada and total imports, 









by months 


, 1934-35 


and 1935 


-36 










1934- 


35 






1935 


-36 






Certified seed 


Total 


Certified seed 


; Total 




potatoes < 


potatoes 


potatoes a/ 


potatoes 




Canada 


Tutal 


Canada 


Total 


Canada 


Total 


Canada 


Total 




Bushels 


Bushel s 


Bushels 


Bushels 


Bushels 


Bushels 


Bushels 


' Bushels 


Dec. . . . 


3,792 


3,792 


35,897 


37,634 


25, 618 


25,618 


33,797 


41,750 


Jan. . . . 


0 


. 0 


23,532 


37,299 


20 , 634 


20 , 634 


30,306 


35,227 


Feb 


14 , 650 


14,650 


33,951 


40,986 


7,036 


7,036 


15,237 


30 , 621 


Mar. . . . 


14,893 


14,893 


46,756 


48 , 497 


188,919 


183,919 


190 , 682 


206,862 


Apr. . . 


6,017 


6,017 


29 , 488 


61,431 


135,599 


135,599 


174,448 


190,352 


May. . . 


10,252 


10,252 


104,022 


106,819 


19,964 


19 ,964 


65,877 


67,044 


June . . 


2,444 


2,444 


5,715 


5,715 


16,633 


16,648 


217,481 


225,008 


July . . 


0 


0 


146 


192 


25 


25 


59,937 


60,246 


Aug . . . 


0 


0 


0 


413 


2,492 


2,492 


12 , 554 


12,814 


Sept . . 


0 


0 


55 


110 


2,671 


2,671 


3,155 


3,322 


Oct. . . 


0 


0 


1,856 


1,912 


49 , 523 


49 , 523 


52,001 


52,001 


Total. 


52 , 043 


52,048 


38 6, 408 


341,008 


469 , 114 


469 , 129 


3oo,475 


925,247 


a/ The 


quota yea 


r begins 


December 


1. 











814 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 26 

PROGRESS Oi' AG-HI CULTURAL TRADE WISE CANADA, CONT'D 

UNITED STATES; Imports from Canada, of agricultural commodities on which 

duties were reduced, January-Oc toper, 1935 and 1936 

Januar y-0 c t o b e r a./ 



Commodity 



Unit 



Quantity 



Value 



: 1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 






1 ,000 


1,000 






dollars 


dollars 


! . 49 


83 


1,469 ■ 


1,337 


; 59 


140 


3 , 559 


7,096 


: ■ 108 


223 


5,028 


5.433 


: 18 


981 


6 


154 


• l 


169 


a/ 

i — , — 


40 


19 


1,150. 


6 


194 


! R 


1 R 


R4-6 


1 R47 

-L , ut; ( 




10 , 031 




1,348. 


654 


326 


87 


62 


: 654 


h/10,357 

— -X 1 


6 7 


h/ 1,410 






d/ 


^fi 

uu 


■ 379 


2 312 


• 40 


253 


\±J 19 


37 


i/ 167 


■ ' ' 273 


i 778 


49 


315 


11 


• rr 

, - DO 


.? r 




Jut 


t o 


?7 


2,6 


405 


: 53 


0 


3 


0 






402 


1,039 


j 1,270 


2,077 


59 


113 


: 5 


14 


6 


24 


: 162 


979 


13 


60. 






78 


217 


i 1,974 


21 


357 


w 


: ' 134 


125 


14 


14 


: 46 


3,164 


9 


257 


: 2,154 


3,310 


380 


273 


I 1,603 


5,591 


261 


889 



Cattle - 
Weighing 
"We ighing 
Total 
Poultry - 

Live. 

Dead c/ 

Total poultry. . . . 
Horses worth not over 
Cheese ej - 

Cheddar fj 



less than 700 lb. b/ 
700 pounds or over.., 
cattle 



Thousand head 
Thousand head 
Thousand head 



$150 



eacn. 



Other gj , 

Total cheese §_/ 

Cream , ! , 

Cereal breakfast food 

Hay 

Oats j_/ 

Vegetables - 

Turnips and rutabagas. 

Seed potatoes (white) , 

Peas, green 

Total vegetables .., 

Pruits - 

Blueberries, frozen , 

Apples , 

Other , 

Total fruits 

Grass and other forage seeds- 
Timothy ■ , 

Canada blue grass , 

Other 

Total grass, etc 

Maple sugar 

Total 



; Thousand lb. 
; Thousand lb . 
•Thousand lb. 
| Thousand head 

1 Thousand lb . 
; Thousand lb . 
; Thousand lb . 
! Gallons 
; Thousand lb . 
; Thousand tons 
•Thousand bu. 

; Million lb. 
! Mi 11 ion lb. 
: Thousand lb. 



: Thousand lb , 
: Thousand bu, 
Thousand lb, 



; Thousand lb, 
j Thousand lb, 
| Thousand lb. 
; Thousand lb. 
•Thousand lb, 



7,310 



14,660 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce . 
a/ Preliminary, b/ Agreement affected only those weighing less than 175 pounds. 
These were not separately classified before Je.nua.ry 1, 1936. cj Does not include 
poultry imported free for use as ship's stores, d/ Less than 500. e/ Excludes 
Swiss, Pomano, Reggiano , Provoloni, Roquefort. f/ Included in "Other" prior to 
January 1, 1936. g/ Not a. concession item, h/ Excludes alsoGluyere, Edam, and 
blue-mold, i/ Does not include ha.y imported free during 1935 shortage. j_/ Duty 
was reduced only on "Oats, hulled, unfit for human consumption", not separately 
classified before January 1, 1936, and during the first 10 months of 1936 formed 
50 percent by volume and 32 percent by value of the item shown. 



December 28, 193& Foreign Crops and Markets 8I5 

PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURAL TRADE WITH CANADA, CONT'D 

UNITED STATES: Imports from Canada "by quarters, January-September, 

and for the month of October, 



1935 and 1936 



Classification 


1935 ! 


1936 a/ 


Increase 
or 

d ftr.rfiasfi 


All Commodities - 


Thousand ; 
dollars I 

JO , CLyH 
71,690 ' 
73,705 

26,573 


Thousand 
dol lar s 

85,810 
102,554 

37,765 


Thousand 
dollars 

+1 R 77R 
+14,120 
+28,849 
+9,192 


Non-agricultural - 


. 232,222 


. , 300,158 


+67,936 


45,785 
55,263 
58,464 
20,393 


57,105 
66,779 
72,189 
P2,64i 


+11 ,320 
+11,516 

+13,725 
+2 . 248 


Agricultural b/ - 


179,905 


218,714 


+38,809 


12,469 

lo, 427 
15,241 


16,924' 

19,031 

30,365 
1R,1?4 


+4,455 
+2 , 01)4 

+15,124 
+6,q44 


Agricultural on which duties were 
reduced under tho agreement- 
Second quarter 

Other agricultural - 


52,317 


81,444 


+29,127 


2,136 
3.532 
1,062 
58O 


j 3,726 
6,420 
3,5^6 

: 1,128 


+1,650 
+2,888 
+2,484 
+548 


7,310 


: '14,880 


+7,570 


10,333 
12,895 

: 1M79 
7,600 


:' 13,132 
: 12,611 
: 26,819 
1 . .13,996 


+2,805 
-284 
+12,640 

+6,396 


45,007 


;" ; 66 ,564 


+21,557 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Preliminary, b/ Does not include distilled spirits. 



816 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. '33, No. 26 

PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURAL TRADE WITH CANADA, CONT'D 
UNITED STATES; Exports to Canada of agricultural commodities on which 



duties wers 


reduce^ January-October, 


1935 and 


1936 










January-October a/ 




Commodity 


: Unit 


quantity 


: Value 




i 


: 1S35 


,: 1936 


: 1955 


: 1936 




i 






1,000 


■ 1,000 




j 






dollars 


' dollars 


Animals - 














] Head 


; 135 


| 277 


58 


; 77 




: Thousand lb , 


! 10 




6 


i 14 










221 


• 252 


Total animals 


; 






285 


' 343 


Meats - 


; 










pork, pickled or salted. . . 


• Thousand lb . 


: - 420- 


-2,842 


46 


: 319 




j Thousand lb . 


'. 214 


523 


48 


: . 108 




\ Thousand lb . 


: 37 


110 


7 


i 14 




: Thousand lb. 


'73' 


163 


31 


■ 57 




; Thousand lb . 


: 303 


51 


40 


i 5 






285 


384 


64 


: 63 




• Thousand lb , 


1,332 


4,073 


236 


: 566 


Other animal products - 












Lard (including neutral 


• 












; Thousand lb. 


557 


1,688 


70 


! ■ 204 




; Thousand lb. 


760 


592 


234 


; 121 




• Thousand doz. 


15 


100 


9 


33 




'• 






10 


: 22 


Total other 


i 












; 






333 


380 


Grains and grain products- 


■ 














b/ 123 


bj 403 


242 


385 




•[Million lb. 


7 


3 ' 


251 


112 


Wheat and wheat flour 


! Thousand lb. 


cj 23 


cj 81 


32 


101 




; Thousand lb. 


678 


767 i 


73 


79 






6 


7 i 


138 


134 










121 


r <n 4 


Total grains and 


t 
t 


■ ' " , 
















857 ' 


1,125 


Vegetables and prepara.t ions- 














•Million lb. 


• - 10 


11 


138 : 


274 


Other fresh vegetables.... 








2 , 35 5 ; 


2,954 










65 j 


108 










66 j 


71 


Vegetable preparations,... 


* 






115 : 


141 


Total vegetables 


• 


















2 , 740 i 


3,548 










Cont 


inued - 



December 28, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 

PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURAL TRADE THTH CANADA , CONT'D 



817 



UNITED STATES: Exports to Canada of agricultural commodities on which 
duties were reduced, January-October, 1935 and 1936, Cont'd. 



Commodity 



Fruit and preparations - 

Oranges, fresh 

Grapefruit, fresh .... 

Apples , fresh 

Pears, fresh 

Other fresh fruit .... 

Pears, dried 

Peaches, dried 

Apricots, dried 

Other dried and 

evaporated fruit . . . 

Apricots, canned 

Peaches, canned 

Pineapples, canned ... 
Other canned and 

preserved fruit . . . . 
Total fruit 
and preparations 

Nuts - 

Pecans 

. Other nuts 

Total nuts 

Molasses 

Sirup, including maple . 
Malt extract and sirup . 

Fruit juices 

Field and garden seeds . 
Hursery and greenhouse 

stock 

Miscellaneous items .... 



Total 



January -October a/~ 



Uni t 


Quantity : 


Value 




1935 


1936 : 


1935 , 


1936 




; 




1 , 000 : 


1, 000 




; 




dollars : 


do liar s 


inuusaiiu- uai 


, j 

d/ 768, 


d/ 1,109; 


d/ i,yii' 


A 1 O 

Ol 1 0 , CiO-l. 


Thousand bx. 








924 


Thousand lb. 


e/ 6,252 


e/ 8,69li 


17 &; 


197 


Thousand lb. 


1 7 cp^ 


22 450 


470; 


568 








1 , 844 


2,537 


Thousand lb. 


234 


305 


IS 


21 


Thousand lb. 


1,312 


1,554 


95; 


125 


Thousand lb. 


647! 

: 


■ 1,038 


76 


11C 


Thousand lb. 


eoe! 




43 


68 


Thousand lb. 


34 


165; 


a! 


11 


Thousand lb. 


123 


112: 


9; 


8 


Thousand lb. 


CT Q' 




^i: 

Oil 


1 2Q 




1 . 203 


1,440! 


120; 


159 


1 UO LiScul X lUi 










Thousand lb. 






5 ,.540 


7,478 


Thousand lb. 


126: 


968: 


53 


226 


Thousand lb. 


978! 


99lj 


173 


153 


Thousand lb. 


1,104 


1, 959: 


22 6; 


"379 


Thousand gal 


24 5| 


397: 


50T 


57 


Thousand gal< 


41; 


44 


S: 


13 


Thousand lb. 


137;' 


132- 


9: 


8 


Thousand gal. 


. 324 


. 5 3lj 


257: 


359 


Thousand lb. 


1, 410: 


3,774 


219: 


341 








148: 


213 










21 








10,9CQ 


14,831 



Compiled from official record of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Preliminary, b/ Cornmeal converted at the rate of 4 bushels of corn to 1 
barrel of meal, c/ Wheat flour converted at the rate of 4.7 bushels of wheat 
to 1 barrel of flour, d/ January to April, free entry having been granted under 
the agreement for these months only, e/ Apples converted at the following rates 
48 pounds to 1 bushel basket, 44 pounds to 1 box, 140 pounds to 1 barrel. 



818 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 26 

PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURAL TRADE WITH CANADA , CONT'D 



UNITED STATES: Exports to Canada "by quarters, January-September, 

and for the month of October, 
1935 and 1936 



Classification 


1935 


1936 aj 


Increase 
or 

decrease 


All commodities - 


Thousand 

n n "1 "I O T* c 

UUXXcLX o 

fi7 7Qp 

83 , 283 
80,503 
28,952 


Thousand 

' ^ a] 1 Q T* Q 

U-U X J- c~J- 

7^ Q 4P 
98,976 
90,751 . 
37,105 


Thousand 

H n 1 1 arc 

+8 , 150 
+15,' 693 
+10,248 

+8,153 


Non-agricultural - 


250,530 


302,774 


+42,244 


c; 1 ? A T 
D ( , C 

72,78? 

71,078 
25.310 


Oft , +oC> 

85,075 

80,085 
31,758 


i TO , C3iO 

;. +12,288 
: +9,007 
+6,448 


Agricultural - 


22^,918 


261,353 


! +34,435 


10,049 

10,495 

9 , 425 
3,642 


11,507 

13,901 

10,666 
5.347 


\ +1,458 

i +3,405 

: +1,241 
: +1.705. 


Agricultural on ishich duties vrere 
reduced under the agreement - 


33,612 


41,421 


• +7,809 


3,552 

: 4,062 

: 2,409 
867 


4, 451 
5,568 

3,670 
1.142 


i t o o o 

; +889 

i +1* 506 

: +1,261 
: +275 


Other agricultural - 


10,900 


14,831 


• +3,931 


6,487 ; 
: 6 , 434 ; 

7, 016 
: 2.775 


7,056 
8,333 
6,996 
4.205 


i +569 
: +1,899 
: -20 
• +1.430 




; 22,712 


26,590 


+3,878 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 

Commerce . 

a/ Preliminary. 



December 28, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



819 



3EEF, CAMED, I?TCLTJDIiv r G- C0HN2D BEEF : Imports (for consumption) into the 
United States, by months, 1934 to 1936 



Ye ar 


Country from which irrrnorteri 




\ Unit 
! value pe: 


and 




TTvht mT D^r 

U X UigU.d/.y 


: r\ +■ Vi rs r» 


: Total 


lot a± 


Month 






• c yunDi ic s 


value 


: pound 
■j 




1 , 000 


1,000 


; 1 , 000 


\ 1,000 


| 1,000 






pounds 


pounds 


• pounds 


\ pounds 


dollars 


; Cents 


1934 - 














J anuary 


1,106 


392 


\ 70 


! 1,568 


: 121 


j 7.7 


February 


779 


445 


: 120 


: 1 , 344 


: 97 


j 7.2 


March 


". 1,837 


1,097 


; . ' 61 


! 2,995 


': 198 


: 6. 6 


April .......... 


923 


2,851 


: 8 


3,782 


j 258 


: 6.8 


Mav. . ... . . .. 


1,094 


2,291 


■ 85 


3,470 


■ 231 


: 6. 7 


June ........... 


724 


1 , 714 


: 81 


■ 2,519 


1 181 


: 7.2 


July. .......... 


1,397 


2,867 


: 15 


\ 4,279 


: 252 


: 5.9 


'Aueu^t . . 


1,399 


4, 691 


105 


i 6,195 


; 362 


: 5.8 


S en t emh b t* . 


1, 694 


2,503 


30 


4,227 


' 269 


: 6.4 


Oc t ober ........ 


1 , 420 


3,162 


4 


4,586 


\ 281 


: ' 6.1 


"Kroverabev . ...... 


1,409 


3,023 


8 


4,440 


'• 278 


' 6.3 


December . 


3,680 


3, 557 


. 32 


. 7,269 


: 488 


: 6.7 


Total 


17,462 


28,593 


619 


46, 674 


: 5,015 


: 6.5 


1935 - 














January ....... 


2,858 


1,133 


108 


4,099 


: 285 


i 7.0 


February 


1,893 


2,288 


41 


4,222 


289 


• 6.8 


March 


2,979 


4, 620 


91 


7, 690 


: 519 


: 6.7 


April , 


3,193 


6,224 


79 


9,496 


647 


!■■ • ' 6.8 


May, 


3,135 


3,905 


36 


7,076 


506 • 


: 7.2 


June 


2,488 


3,124 


299 


5,911 


419 


: 7.1 


July. 


2,238 


2,753 


229 


5,220 


378 


: 7.2 


August. 


2, 701 


2,442 


597 


5 , 740 


411 


■ 7.2 


September 


3,442 


3,934 


376 


7, 752 


564 


: 7.3 


October 


1, 716 


3, 092 


571 


5, 379 


375 


: 7.0 


Total 10 mos. 


26, 643 


33, 515 


2,427 


52, 585 


4 , 39 3 


7.0 


November 


2,665 


3, 591 


555 


6,811 


565 


8.3 


December 


2,435 


3, 995 


437 


6 , 8 57 


507 


8.8 


Total 


31,743 


41 , 101 


3.419 


76, 263 


5, 565 


7.3 


1936 - 














January 


2,222 


5,136 


284 


7,642 ; 


769 


10.1 


February 


2, 676 


4,417 


1:25 : 


7,218 j 


710 


9.B 


March 


3,342 


4,408 


228 : 


7,978 j 


811 


10.2 


April 


5,889 


5,787 


221 . 


11,897 i 


1,140 


9.6 


May 


3,479' 


5,101 : 


74 ; 


8,554 i 


824 


9.5 


June , 


2,983 


4,010 


41 ; 


7,034 • 


659 


9.4 


July 


3,133 


4,263 


no j 


7,506 j 


701 : 


9.3 


August ' 


5,046' 


3,795 


97 \ 


8,938 | 


838 : 


9.4 


September j 


3,021: 


3,273 


145 : 


6,439 j 


613 • 


9.5 


.October. '• 


4,755 


3.975 


264 S 


8,994 i 


824 : 


9.2 


Tnt.pl 10 mos.i 


36,545 


44.165 


1,589 


82,300 


7,689 • 


9.6 



Compiled from offi 
Bureau of Foreign 



cial recrods 
and Domestic 



of the United States Tariff Commission and 
Commerce. 



the 



820 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 26 

WHEAT: Closing Saturday prices of May futures 





Chi cago 


Kansas City 


Minneapolis 


Winnipeg a/ 


Liverpool a, 


/ Buenos 
Aires b/ 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


^_1935 


193^ 


1935 
Cents^ 


1936 


1935 


193« 


High c/ 

Low c7 
Nov . 28 ... . 
Dec. 5 ... 

12 .. . 

19 ... 


Cents 


Gents 
134 
112 
118 
121 
125 
132 


Cents 
108 

94 
97 
96 
98 
99 


Cents 


Cents 
122 " 
104 
108 
106 
109 
103 


Cerits 
141 
120 
127 
129 
133 
140 


Cents 
99 

86 . 

88 

87 

89 

88 


Cents 
~127~~ 
106 
110 
114 
117 
125 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


106 
94 
97 
96 
99 

100 


128 
108 
113 
115 
119 
126 


93 
81 
86 
84 
90 
92 


' 131 
110 
116 
120 
123 
130 


d/ 92 
d/ 66 
e/ 73 
f/ 69 
f/ 91 
f / 91 


dTlOl 
d/ 91 
el 94 
f / 91 
f / 93 
f/101 



a/ Conversions at noon "buying rate of exchange, b/ Prices are of day previous to 



d/ December and February futures, e/ December 
WHEAT: Weekly weighted average cash price at stated markets 



other prices, c/ October 1 to date, 
futures f / February futures. 



Week 
ended 



High b/. 
Low b/ . . 
Nov. 28. 
Dec. 5. 

12. 

19. 



All c 

and g 
six m 



lasses 
rades 
arke t s 



1935 



Cents 
112"' 

96 
99 
98 
97 
102 



1936 



Cents 
142 
126 
126 
130 
131 
142 



No. 

Hard W 
Kansas 
1935 



2 

inter 
City 
1936 



Cents 
123 
109 
113 
109 
110 
111 



Cents 
137 
120 
123 
128 
130 
137 



No . 1 
Dk.N. Spring 
Mdnne ap o_l _i_s 
1935 i 1936" 



Cents 
139 
125 
131 
128 
125 
128 



Cent s 
162 
139 
141 
139 
155 
162 



No. 2 Hard 
Amber Durum 
Mi nn eapoli s 
1935 1936 



Cents 
121 
108 
114 
108 
113 
115 



Cent s 



183 
135 
135 
175 
154 
183 



No. 2 
Red Winter 
St. Louis 



Cents 
' 113 
102 
105 
102 
103 
107 



Cent s 
13?" 
118 
123 
127 
130 
137 



Western 
White 
Seattle a/ 



1935 



Cents 

90 
82 
84 
83 
83 
87 



1936 



Cents 
112" 

% 

9.1 
cl 
3/ 108 
112 



a/ Weekly average of daily cash quotations, basis No. 1 sacked. b/October 1 to date, 
e/ No quotations since October 31, to December 9, on account of strike, d/ average 
for December 10 and 11. 

IRISH FREE STATE: Acreage of specified crops, 1932 to 1936 



Harvest year 


Wne at 


Oats 


Barley 


Potatoes 




1,000 acres 


1,000 acres 


1,000 acres 


~~ 1,000' acres 


1932 


21 


632 


103 


348 


1933 


50 


635 


117 


341 


1934 


94 


583 


143 


343 1 


1935 


163 


614 


139 


336 


1936* 


255 


559 


130 


334 



Compiled from official sources. 



r 

December 28, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 821 



FEED GRAINS AND RYE; Weekly average price per "bushel of corn, rye, 
■ oats, and barley at leading markets a/ 



■J" 1 


Corn 


: Rye 




Cats 


Barley 




Chicago 


BuenosAires 


'Minneapolis 


Chicago 


■Minneapoli s 


Week 


No. 


3 














No. 


3 






ended 


Yellow 


Futures 


Futures 


No. 


2 


White 


No. 


2 




1 Q7C* 


i o n a 


19oo 


193o 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 




Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Hign Dj . , . 


96 


118 


62 


108 


42 


50 


bO 


llo 


58 


52 


llo 


13o 


Low b/ . . . . 


58 


59 


56 


94 


37 


47 


A ■*) 

42 




27 


25 


A 1 

41 


58 








Dec. 


Dec. 


Dec. 


, Jan. 














.Nov. 21 


66, 


108 


61 


105 


37 


47 


TIC/ 




•29 


46 


<S4 














Jan. 


Feb. 














28 


58 


104 


59 


105 


38 


48 


48 


95 


29 


47 


47 


128 


Dec. 5 


59 


105 


58 


108 


38 


49 


47 


98. 


28 


47 


55 


128 








May 


May_ 


















12 ' 


59' 


107 


60 


106 


38 


49 


49 


100 


, 29 


50 


59 


129 












Feb. 
















19 • 


59 


107 


60' 


107 


40 


50 


49. 


113 


29 


52- 


60 


131 



a/ Cash prices are weighted averages of reported sales; future prices are simple 
averages of daily quotations, b/ For period January 1 to latest date shown. 



FFED GRAINS; Movement from principal exporting countries 



Exports ; Shipments 1936, ; Exports as far 
Commodity for year | week ended a_/ ! as reported 

, and j j j ; I ; July 1; 1935-36 1936-37 

Country j 1934-35 1935-36;Dec. 5 -Dec. 12 jDec. 19: to j b/ j b/ 



'; 1,000: 1,000 : l,000 : 1,000 ; 1,000; : 1,000 : 1,000 

: bushel g Bushels; bushels ' bushel s ,' bushels \ - bushel s ' bushels 

BARLEY, EXPORTS: cj I ; j ~ j : j ; \ 

United States : 4,050- 9,886: 0; 0 j obec. 19; 5,711] 3,938 

Canada ; 14,453= 6,882: i JNov. 30 \ 3,848:13,743 

Argentina ] 20,739: 9,468: 396: j :Dec. 5] 2,817 ] 3,871 

Danube. & U.S. S.R. ! 11,250: 37 ,375: 404; 272 1 1 , 296 ;Dec . 19 | 33 , 145 j I9 r 343 

Total j 50,492; 63,611; ; j j i 45 , 521 j 41 , 395 

OATS, EXPORTS: e/ ! i : ! \ ] ] ! 

United States : 1,147: 1,429; 0"! 1; 0 :Dec, 19 j 483= 313 

Canada ; 17,407; 14,892 : : ' -Nov. 30: 8,418; 5,573 

Argentina ! 43,753: 9 , 790 i 834 j 399; 41 Dec. 19; 6,210 j 6,786 

Danube &U.S.S.R. S 8,444! 2,847: 0 j 500 : 0 Dec. 19 - 1,590 j 800 

Total ; 70,751: 28,958 j ] J j j 16,506 j 15,472 

QAHN, EXPORTS : &/ ; ; ; j j Nov. 1 to ! j 

United States \ 880 > 885: 3! 0 ; 0 :Dec. 19 ] 2] 4 

Danube & U.S. S.R. i 14,939 i 14,984 : 331: 468: 519 'Dec. 19 | 2,315: 3,070 

Argentina 1256,143:307,439; 8,551: 6,697: 8,315 Dec. 19 : 41,579 ; 58,216 

South Africa. j 21 1 882 ] 8, 910 j 68 : Q j 25 pec. 1 9_i — 3_ # J i 4^4_l*5SQ. 

Total 393 ,844 -332,218.: ; : ! -_ 47 , 542 . ] q2 J££l 

Wit ad States ; I j ] • \ ; j 

^Ports : 41,141 : 24,521 ; ] ; j ] ! 



Compiled from official and trade sources, a/ The weeks shown in these columns are 
nearest to the date shown, b/ preliminary, c/ Year beginning July 1. d/ Year 



322 Foreign Crops and. Markets Vol.33, No. 26 

COTTON: Price per pound of representative raw cotton at Liverpool, 
December 13, 1936, with comparisons 



1936 



w X U W Oil 


' October 


November 




December : 






ou 


c 

u 


1 3 • 


PO 


& ( 


A 

X , 


n 1 

JL JL 


1 R 

a-O 


— .. 




r.p-ri +■ a 

\J U b 


ucll j b, 


Pi^n +■ c 
ucll V b 


lient.s 






v en t s 


Jiill C 1 J. LcUl *" 




















13.87 


14.06 


13.64J 


13.77 


1 "X 71 
lo 1 il 


13.91; 


14.15: 




Low Middling 


12.65 


12.64 


12.26: 


12.39 


12,32 


12.48; 


12.68; 


12.60 


Egyptian (Fully good fair) 


















Sakellaridis 


23.26 


23.08 


23.83: 


23.00 


23.36 


22.05; 


21.91 


21.05 


Uppers , 


14.77 


15.05 


14. 94: 


15.20 


15.06 


15.25: 


15.44 


15.47 


Brazilian (Fair) - 


















Ceara 


12.99 


13.14 


12.77; 


12.90 


12.83 


12.99: 


13.19 : 


13.11 


Sao Paulo 


13.50 


13.65 


13.27, 


13.41 


13.34 


13.50-; 


13.70; 


13.63 


East Indian - 


















Broach (Fully good) .... 


11.12 


11.32 


10.96: 


11.12 


11.08 


11.19; 


11.36' 


11.19 


C.P.Oomra No.l, Superfine 


11.45 


11.64 


11.28: 


11.51 


11.47 


11.58; 


11 . 74 


11.58 


Sind (Fully good) 


9.57 


9.71 


9.45: 


9.68 


9.63 


9.74 






Peruvian (G-ood) 


















Tanguis 


17.07 


17.21 


16.83; 


17.07 


17.02 


17.17; 







Converted at current exchange rate. 



BUTTER: Price per pound in New York, San Francisco, Copenhagen, and 
London, December 24, 1936, with comparisons 



Market and descriptioi 



1936 



1935 



New York, 92 score 

San Francisco, 92 score .... 
Copenhagen, official quotation 
London: 

Danish 

New Zealand 

Dutch 

Siberian 



December 17 


December 24 


December 26 


gents 


Ce_nts 


Cen ts 


34.5 


34.8 


34.5 


33.5 


a/ 


35.5 


18.7 


17.9 


22.6 


24.3 


24.1 


28.2 


21.8 


20.6 


19.9 


21.2 


eJ 


21.2 


20.7 


20.0 


a/ 







Foreign prices converted at current rates of exchange, 
a/ Quotation not available. 



December 28, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



823 



■ BUTTER: New Zealand grading, 1936-37 season to .December 11, 

with comparisons 



Date 




I 

; 1934-35 


; 1935-36 


'. 1936-37 






* ~] r\r\r\ — 1 — _ 

l. OOO pounds 


■ 1 . 000 pounds 


> 1 , 0U0 pounds 






• 16 » O JC 


! 1 A 71 7 








4 738 


! 4 368 


: 5 , 040 


11 






5 040 


'• s ^44 


18 




, W , 6U _L 


i O , O f ™ 


kJ i O O W 






;. fi.RRO 


: 5.768 


' 6,654 






on 


! 20,552 


;, 23,128 


October 2 




7 . 700 


! 6 4Q6 

' w ► u r u 


7 R60 

a t ■ WW W 


9 




* 8 333 


i 7 633 


8 1 ?0 


16 




' 8 848 


' fi P^P 


1 8 960 






: y , loo 


! 9,20b 


; y,520 






9 , 96R 


3,0(0 


' Q 






44 , 005 


! 41,143 


43, 904 






io, 192 


10, 24b 


10, 3o0 






10,416 


j 10,136 


11,200 






in Ale 


• 1 O 4.79 


XU , JCU 






10.808 


: 10.360 : 


10,976 






41,R.^2 


; 41,216 


43,456. 






10,192 


i 10,696 : 


10,696 






9.968 


: 10.696 :' 


11. 032 


Total August 1 to December 11.. i 


141,860 


: 139 , 020 • 


144,441 


Agricultural Attache' 


C. C. Taylor, London. 






BUTTER: 


Australian grading, 1936-37 season tn November 28, 






with comparisons 




Date 


1934-35 : 


1935-36 ; 


1936-37 


Week ended 




1 , 000 pounds : 


1 , 000 -pounds : 


1*,000 pounds 


July 1 to August 29 ■ 




14,561 


11,744 : 


7,997 






2,912 ; 


2,379 ! 


2,612 






3,835 i 


3,040 • 


2,639 






4,482 j 


3 , 075 ; 


3,060 






5 , 078 : 


3,940 


3,759 




16,307 : 


12,435 


12,070 






5,784 


4,771 : 


3,721 






6 , 500 • 


5,383 " 


4,059 






6 , 516 ; 


6 , 704 i 


4,731 






7,302 : 


7,155 i 


4,525 






8,617 : 


7.728 


4,988 


October total 


34 , 719 : 


31 , 741 


22, 024 


November 7 




8,590 


8,212 : 


4,997 






8,803 ; 


8,631 : 


5,096 






7 , 526 | 


8,384 i 


5,596 






10, 022 : 


8, 08S 


5,042 


November total 


34,941 : 


33.313 


20. 831 


Total July 1 to November 28... 


. 100,528 : 


89,233 j 


62,922 



Weekly Dairy Produce Notes, Imperial Economic Committee. 



824 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 2 6 



GHA.IHS: Exports from the United States, July 1 -Dec. 19, 1935 and 1936 ' 
POEK: Exports from the United States, Jan. l-Dcc.19, 1935 and 1936 



Commodity 



July 1 - Dec .19; ' 



CM INS: 
Wheat a/ , 



Corn 
Oats 
Eye. 



POEK ; 

Hams and shoulders 

Bacon, including sides. 
Pickled pork. 



La r d, excluding neutral 



Jan.. 1 

1,000 
pounds 
53 , 617 
6,883 
8,164 
92,732 



Dec. 19 

1,000 
pound s 

39 , 467 
5,832 

10,288 
103,911 



Weed ended 



1935 


1936 


Nov . 28 


Dec. 5 


Dec. 12 


Dec. 19 


1 , 000 


1,000 


1,000 


1 , 000 


1,000 


1 , 000 . 


"bushels 


"bushels 


"bushels 


"bushels 


bushels 


"bushels 


74 


1,674 


0 


0 


0 


17 


6,930 


7,483 


61 


146 


' 38 


287 


5,711 


3,938 


" 0 


0 


0 


0 


49 


175 


0 


3 


• 0 


0 


117 


16 


0 


0" 


1 


0 


0 


1 


0 


0 


1 


0 



1,000 
p ound s 
731 
99 
59 
2,377 



1,000 
pounds 
531 

95 
C 

1,916 



1,000 
pounds 
294 
135 
43 
1,372 



1,000 
pound s 
525 
1,142 
35 
920 



Official records, Bureau of 'Foreign and Domestic Commerce, a/ Included this 
week: Pacific ports, wheat, none; flour, none; from Sari Francisco, "barley, none, 
rice, none, b/ I:icludes flour milled in bond from Canadian wheat, in terms of 
wheat . 

WHEAT*, INCLUDING FLOUR: Shipments from principal exporting countries 
as given by current trade sources, 1933-34 to 1935-36 



Country ] 


Total 
shipment s 


Shipments 1936 
week ended 


Shipment s 
July 1 - Dec. 19 


1934-35 '1935-35 


Dec. 5 


Dec. 12 


Dec. 19 


1934-35 


1935-36 




1,000 
bushel s 


1 , 000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1 ,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushe 1 s 


1,000 
bushels 


162,832 
175,059 
21, 532 


219 , 683 
246,199 
15 , 930 


6, ,608 
9 ,'l20 

145 


3,708 
4,091 
42 


3,416. 
1,304 


89,152 
165,075 
6,930 


137 , 370 
151,723 
7,483 


Danube and Bulgaria d/. . ; 


136 , 228 
111,628 
1,672 
4,104 
c/ 2.319 


77,334 
110,080 

30,224 
8,216 
c /2 , 529 


1,336 
1,812 

0 

1,648 

536 


1,053 
. 1,604 

0 

432 
■376 


1,323, 
1,264 

.0 
1)680 
72 


50,020 
43,464 
24 , 144 
7,403 
256 


27,904 
32,404 

. 88 ■ 
38,800 
6,632 




463,732 


448 , 101 












Total European ship- ' 


337.752 


355,032 


9 ,872 






77 ' 

152,608 


77 

180,040 


Total ex- Europe an ship- 


147,938 


133,523 


2,328 






f/ . 
58,064 


tl 
60,744 



Compiled from official and trade sources. a/ Broomhall's Corn Trade News. b/Fort 
William, Port Arthur, Vancouver, Prince Eupert, and New 'Westminster, c/ Official. 
4/ Bla ck Sea shipments only, e/ Total of trade figures includes North America 
as reported by Broomhall. f/ To December '5. 



December 28, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



825 



EXCHANGE RATES: Average weekly and monthly values in New York of 
specified currencies, December 19, 1936, -1th comparisons a/ 



C oun t ry 


; Monetary 
; Unit ' 


Argentina* , ■ 


Paper peso 


Canada* .... 




China. 


Shang.yuan 


Denmark. . . . 




England. . . . 




France 




Germany, .v. 


■ Reichsmark 


Italy 


Lira. 


Japan : 


Yen 


Mexico ■ 




Netherlands j 


■ ' Guilder. . . 


Norway j 




Sweden : 


Krona. .... 


Switzerland i 


Franc 



Month 



1934 


t -L <J O *J 


1936 


• 1336 


Nov . 




: 'Sept.: 






; Dec. 


; Dec . 


. Dec. 


, 1M U V . 


Oct . 


1 Nov. 


; 5 


i 12 


: 19 


Cent s 


: Cents 


: Cents ■ 


Cents 


'• Cents 


; Cents 


• Cents 


: Cents 


33.26 


• 32.82 


33.61: 


32.67 


; 32 . 58 


: 32 . 69 


i 32. 69 


; 32.73 


102.47 


' 98.92 


100.02100.02 


100. 12 


:ioo.05 


J-00.07 


•L00. 10 


33. 39 


29. 65 


29.94; 


29.33 


; 29.47 


29 . 60 


; 29. 62 


• 29.39 


22. 27 




22.48; 


21.87 


Ol DO 


O" 1 on 


: 21 .00 


; 21 . 92 


498.90 


492.50 


503.63489.84 


188.80 


490.38 


490.03 


491.02 


6.59 


6.59 


6.51; 


4.67 


4.65 


4.66 


4.66 


4.67 


40.21 


40.23 


40.08: 


40.20 


40.22 


40.23 


40.23 


40.23 


8.54 


8.10 


7.85: 


5.53 


5.26 


5.26 


5.26 


5.26 


29. 0& 


28 . 68" 


29.41; 


28.61 


28,56 


28.56 


28.52 


28.55 


27.76 


27.77: 


27.75; 


27.75 


27,75 


27.75 


27.75 


27.75 


67. 6o! 


67.80: 


66.74: 


53.63 ! 


53.99 , 


54.39 


54.42 


54.57 


25.07: 


24.74: 


25 . 30: 


24.61 : 


24.56 | 


24.64 


24, 63 


24.67 


25.72; 


25.39; 


25.96: 


25.25 ■ 


25.20 ; 


25.28 : 


25.27 ; 


25.31 


32.47; 


32.44; 


31.42: 


22.99 i 


22.98 


22.99 : 


22.98 i 


22.99 



Federal Reserve Board, a/ Noon buying rates for cable transfers. 



LIVESTOCK AND MEAT: Price per 100 pounds in specified European markets 

December 16, 1936, with comparisons a/ 


Market and item 


Week ended 


December 18, 
1935 


December 9, 
: 1935 


• Decern ber 16, 

• 1936 


Germany: „ , 

Price of lard, tcs., Hamburg 

United Kingdom: b/ 

Prices -at Liverpool first quality- 
Danish Wiltshire sides 

Canadian green sides 

American short cut green hams 

American refined lard 


Dollars 

17.70 
13.98 

Nominal 
18.04 
15.29 i 
20.31 : 
14.76 


Dollars 

17.70 
14.36 

18.16 
19.77 
17.65 
20.46 i 
15.05 ; 


: Dollars 

17.70 
14.87 

18.19 
20.16 
17.86 
20.49 
15.47 



rpool quotations are on the basis of sale from importer to wholesaler. 
Converted at current rate of exchange, b/ Week ended Friday. 



826 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, Uo, 26 



Index 



y - - 

. : ^:%f Page 

Late cables. . . 802 

Crop and Market Prospects. 803 



AGRICULTURAL TRADE, UNITED STATES- 

CM AD A, JAMJARY-OCTOBER, 1936 803 

Apples and pears, import duty, 

Norway, Jan. 19, 193? 808 

Barley: 
Area: 

Argentina, 1935, 1936 803 

Irish Free State, 1932-1936, 802,820 
Production, Argentina, 1935,1936. 803 
Beans (dry), production Hokkaido, 

Japan, 1935,1936 805 

Butter: 
Grading s: 

Australia, Nov. 28, 1936 . . 8^23 

New Zealand, Dec. 11, 1936 823 

Prices, specified markets, 

December 24, 1936. 822 

Cotton: 

Consumption, Italy, . 1935-36 806 

Prices, U.K., Dec. 13, 1936 822 

Production, India, 1935,1936 806 

Cottonseed oil, production, Sao 

Paulo, Brazil/ 1936 808 

Exchange rates, foreign, 

Dec. 19, 1936 ^ 825 

Flaxseed; 

Area, Argentina, 1335,1936 803 

Production, Argentina, 1935,1936. 803 
Grains: 

Exports, U.S., Dec. 13, 1936 82* 

Movement (feed), principal 

countries, Dec. 19, 1936 821 

Prices (feed), principal markets, 

Dec. 19, 1935 821 

Livestock, numbers, Irish Free State, 
June 1, 1936 802 



Page 

Meat: 

Exports (pork) U.S., 

Dec. 19, 1936 824 

Imports (beef), U.S., 1934-1936.. 819 
Prices (pork), foreign markets, 

Dec. 16, 1936 825 

Oat s: 
Area: 

Argentina, 1935,1936. 803 

Irish Free State, 1932-1936 802,820 
Production; Argentina, 1935,1936 803 
Peas, (green), production, Hokkaido, 

"japan, 1935,1936 805 

potatoes, .area, Irish Free State, 

1932-1935 802,820 

Pyrethrum, production, Hokk&itdo, 

Japan, 1935,1936..... 805 

Rapeseed, production, Hokk&iio, 

Japan, 1935,1936 , 805 

Rye: 

Area, Argentina, 1935,1936 803 

Prices, U.S., Dec. 19, 1936 821 

Production, Argentina, 1935,1936 803 
Who at : 
Area: 

Argentina, 1935,1936 803 

Irish Free State, 1932-1936 002,820 



Import prospects (flour), - 

Manchuria, 1936-37 804 

Market conditions, China, 

Dec. 1, '1336 , 804 

Prices: 

Shanghai, Dec. 1, 1336 804 

Specif ied markets, Dec . 13, 1936 830 
production: 

Argentina, 1935,1936 003 

Manchuria, 1935,1936 004 

Shipments, principal countries, 
■ • -Dec. 19, -1936./. 024